Particulate Matter Air Sensors

purpleairdireciton

How to use the PurpleAir Sensor Map:
As of January 3, 2019, we have moved the PurpleAir Sensor map from the beta stage to the PurpleAir Sensor host. This will give you access to all PurpleAir sensors active in the world. To make sure the Lane County ones are accurate to our area, please apply the correct conversion factor in the map legend. There is a small drop down menu where you can select "LRAPA." It will show you the correct readings when the conversion is applied. 

To gather more information about particulate matter (PM) pollution, LRAPA has been testing small personal air sensors for the last few years. We have found particular luck and accuracy with a PurpleAir Monitor and we have been working hard to distribute these small particulate matter air sensors throughout the county.

Community buildings, fire stations, local schools, and even at our stationary monitoring stations have been equipped with these sensors. While the technology in this is not as sophisticated as our stationary monitoring site equipment, it is a reliable way to check local impacts from wildfires or woodsmoke. These air sensors did require a calibration with a correction factor for our area. In this way, we were able to get the most accurate and consistent data from these sensors.



McKenzie Bridge/Terwilliger Fire Info

Residents of McKenzie Bridge area can follow along with the wildfire smoke particulate matter levels on the map above. Two new particulate matter air sensors have been installed at the McKenzie Bridge High School and USFS bunkhouse. 

Latest fire information https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6160/

Clean Air Kids Program 

This initiative was started by LRAPA in response to local schools wanting more information about safe air quality levels for outdoor activities. This provides schools with the necessary tools to determine activity levels pending local air quality during high pollution times like wildfire season and winter wood heating days. Participating schools received a free air sensor through a Department of Environmental Quality grant. Students, parents, teachers, coaches, and administrators can use this information along with the guidelines from OSAA and the Oregon Health Authority to make decisions about activity levels: